Bitcoin 2014 Amsterdam Conference Releases Full Schedule

Pay for your tickets for the official Bitcoin conference 2014 in Amsterdam with ...

Pay for your tickets for the official Bitcoin conference 2014 in Amsterdam with ... submitted by oerwouter to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Anyone attending the Bitcoin Conference 2014 in Amsterdam?

I am planning on going to the Bitcoin Conference 2014 to show some Vertcoin presence and I was wondering if I would meet any of you guys there to hang out and chat. :)
Also, if one of you crypto and Vertcoin enthusiasts lives in Amsterdam; I am looking for a place to crash for these 3 to 4 days. Any help/ideas highly appreciated! :)
submitted by lacksfish to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin 2014 Conference Gets Underway in Amsterdam Today

Bitcoin 2014 Conference Gets Underway in Amsterdam Today submitted by bitcoin_nihilist to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Conference Amsterdam 2014 - Guide to the City

Bitcoin Conference Amsterdam 2014 - Guide to the City submitted by GuerrillaBTC to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Conference - Bitcoin 2014 Amsterdam: Video Interviews (playlist)

Conference - Bitcoin 2014 Amsterdam: Video Interviews (playlist) submitted by BitcoinVideo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Conference: Amsterdam Bitcoin 2014. Interview with Tony Gallippi, BitPay.

Conference: Amsterdam Bitcoin 2014. Interview with Tony Gallippi, BitPay. submitted by BitcoinVideo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin 2014 Amsterdam Conference Releases Full Schedule

Bitcoin 2014 Amsterdam Conference Releases Full Schedule submitted by HanumanTheHumane to BitcoinInternational [link] [comments]

Amsterdam Bitcoin 2014: Building the Digital Economy Conference

Amsterdam Bitcoin 2014: Building the Digital Economy Conference submitted by cryptocurrencylive to CryptoCurrencyLive [link] [comments]

Conference: 2014 Blockchain Awards - BITCOIN 2014 - Amsterdam

Conference: 2014 Blockchain Awards - BITCOIN 2014 - Amsterdam submitted by BitcoinVideo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin 2014 Conference in Amsterdam to Host First Annual Blockchain Awards

Bitcoin 2014 Conference in Amsterdam to Host First Annual Blockchain Awards submitted by BTCNews to BTCNews [link] [comments]

Bitcoin 2014 Conference Gets Underway in Amsterdam Today

Bitcoin 2014 Conference Gets Underway in Amsterdam Today submitted by BTCNews to BTCNews [link] [comments]

Bitcoin 2014 Amsterdam Conference Releases Full Schedule

Bitcoin 2014 Amsterdam Conference Releases Full Schedule submitted by BTCNews to BTCNews [link] [comments]

Bitcoin may not have as high TpS as Visa, but at least with bitcoin i’ll never have to worry about this

I originally wrote this a month ago but decided not to post it. After being denied twice since, I have decided that I should post it.
Today my card was blocked in France while trying to top up credit on my phone. I was given three questions, answered each of them correctly (where i’ve lived in boulder, where my brother lives, how old my mom is) and yet I was still blocked. I was also told by my bank that there’s nothing they can do about this, it’s between visa and the merchant, so as long as I try to use visa I will always run into this problem. At any point my card can be blocked because they ask questions that cannot be answered correctly, or even when answered correctly it will still be blocked.
original post
Backstory: I lived in Thailand and had plans to go to a conference in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. Today I used my bank card to purchase one of the few things in life that I can’t with BTC, a visa for Vietnam. However, when going through processing I was asked three verification questions:
Not sure of the exact wording used, but it was basically how did you come to own/how did you buy/etc.. Unfortunately for me I’ve never seen that address in my life, i have no idea where it comes from as I’ve only ever lived at two residences in America, both of which I know the address to. There was option for this is not applicable to me which i chose.
My mom’s last name isn’t tackett though, so I don’t know why they’re using that name. She and my dad have been divorced since before I can remember, so they’re using information that’s out of date since at least 1995. The age ranges they gave me didn’t actually have one with her age, it was something like 25-35, 40-45, 46-55, 60+, my mom is 56. There was no correct answer. I chose the closest and went from there.
My brother moved several months ago, so again, there was no correct answer. But it did have his previous city, so I answered with that.
After all of that they deemed that it was a fraudulent transaction and wouldn’t process it. Luckily for me, the fraud department at my bank was online and was able to remove the block and for me to book my visa. So you may say, “see! the system works." However, when I had this exact same problem in 2013 while in Thailand trying to buy a flight i lost out on hundreds of dollars because I had to go to an agent and pay with cash.
I had a conversation with some people in a bitcoin wechat group im in about how much I hate banks after taking my ICBC (largest bank in the world) card to an ICBC branch in malaysia to withdraw all my money since I can’t use the card in Thailand (even at an ICBC branch). Unfortunately in Malaysia I also can’t use that card, even at an ICBC. People were saying i’m doing myself a disservice by not having a bank, but in the past 8 days i’ve been denied my money from my bank three times, once in Thailand trying to use an ICBC, once in Malaysia trying to use an ICBC, and now by Visa. I’ve never once been prompted to go through verification with bitcoin, i’ve never once been denied the ability to send money, and for the people saying the verification/restrictions are for my safety, i’ve never had as much as a satoshi stolen from me, but i have had to spend hundreds of dollars to fix the mess caused by my banks.
This is why i’ve had my salary paid 100% in bitcoin for over 2 years, this is why I hold the vast majority of my money in bitcoin, and this is why I know that bitcoin has a future. To anybody who says that the current banking system works just fine, that’s ludicrous, start traveling and nearly every day you’ll see why bitcoin is needed; fees to convert currency, 5-50%—yes, it was literally 50% to convert Vietnamese dong to Thai baht at the Phuket airport; fees to withdraw from an ATM ($6, 2%); and tons of places charge you extra 3-5% plus flat fee if you use a cc.
Other stories about why I hate banks
Story time: In 2014 I was at Bitcoin2014 in Amsterdam, had an amazing trip that forever changed my life. While there I discovered that if you don’t have chip & pin a lot of places won’t accept your debit card, and even worse that they don’t even accept cash. My bank didn’t offer chip & pin cards when mine was issued so unfortunately couldn’t use my card nor my cash. When i went back to the states in July I asked specifically for a chip and pin card but they said they still don’t offer them and that I’d have to deal with swipe and sign for the time being. So I got my card and headed off on my travels once more, this time to kyrgyzstan and kazakhstan. When I get there I receive an email from my bank that they’ll promptly be canceling my card as they’re switching everyone over to chip and pin. I could ask for a two-week extension, but that’s it, after that I’ll have to wait for my new card to arrive. They also won’t send cards abroad, so i have to have it sent to my family and then have them ship it to asia (one card has already been lost in this process). So once again, I have no way to access my money.
Second Story time: When bitcoin hit $1000 in 2013 some friends and I took a trip to the Philippines. I sold a bitcoin and had the fiat transferred to my bank account (Wells Fargo). I went to use my card at an ATM and it was denied, I called my bank and tried to get the situation fixed. After going through social security number, recent withdrawal locations/amounts, and account information they said "no problem, we’ll have it all fixed here shortly, just need you to tell me how much your monthly mortgage payments are.” I was 21 and living in Beijing, i didn’t have any mortgage payments. So he let me know that wasn’t a problem, just needed to know how much my monthly car payment was. I was 21 and living in Beijing, I didn't have a monthly car payment. I was then promptly told “bummer, nothing we can do” and had to spend well over an hour going from supervisor to supervisor before I finally got the block lifted. It’s important to note that I notified them of my travel plans well in advance of my trip.
This is why I love bitcoin, my money is actually my money and i can use it 24/7/365. Even if I need to wait 30 minutes for a confirmation, it is vastly superior to not being to use your money at all.
Tldr; Visa has deemed my transactions fraudulent several times because i was unable to answer security questions that don't have correct answers. Bitcoin has never told me I can't spend my money.
submitted by zanetackett to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Foundation: Where did all the Money Go?

This week Charles Hoskinson posted a thoughtful post on the Bitcoin Foundation and his idea that an audit would help the organization break from the past.
I'm happy to support an audit provided someone can lead it and do the work involved and/ or support the costs of one.
I do remain skeptical of the value of an audit. We all know that a lot of money was wasted and lost - I detail the basics of the 2014 spending below -- it is unlikely worse than imagined as all the funds are essentially gone. I don't think much can be done about past mistakes, the people involved are no longer with the organization.
Also this week, someone on an anti-Bitcoin sub posted this data from the 990 forms and was afraid it would be censored if posted on Bitcoin.
I'm happy to post it for them, minus the color commentary and a couple of minor factual inaccuracies.
They also implied that some people would want to not have this information brought to light. I'm more than glad to. I don't defend these financial decisions as I had nothing to do with them. I also had thought the 2014 990 form with this was posted once completed this summer. At that time we were going through a website and server change and I was also recovering from a car accident, so if it was posted it wasn't in the proper place. For not having the 990 form posted in the correct section a few months back , that's on me and I'm sorry.
The bigger matter is the financials themselves.
I don't defend these financials, I certainly don't apologize for them or attempt to justify them. I had nothing whatsoever to do with these decisions.
As you can see the spending / loss was caused by:
1) a large drop in Bitcoin value costing millions of dollars - the peak foundation assets were calculated based on a Bitcoin price in the $800 range -- so, had they simply held those coins it would have seen the $6-7 million fall to $2 million or so
2) ridiculously wasteful and reckless spending
3) reasonable and legitimate expenses such as Gavin and dev salaries
I have not been presented any evidence of any theft, criminal act or similar wrongdoing but would be happy to pay a bounty of at least 10% for anyone with information and evidence of any such act leading to recovery of any funds which were misappropriated or stolen. Those who imply that there is any wrongdoing at the foundation now or by those involved now should come forward with evidence or at least a solid and specific accusation. If presented with any such evidence I would work to have justice done.
It seems strange that so many make an effort to tie those involved now to the sins of the past.
This is the point of a turnaround; to take what an organization has and make it as useful as possible. Many people think that the change in management and new focus, combined with a new mission statement can help the organization to help Bitcoin more.
I wish that the foundation hadn't had so many problems. I did think it was worthwhile to try to help the organization.
Here are the finances:
Salaries
Gavin Andresen: $147k. Chief Scientist. Salary down from $209k (salary was higher in 2013 as it was pegged to BTCUSD)
Jodie Brady: $141k. COO of the Foundation, who also served as CFO at CoinLab (Peter Vessenes' affiliate company).
Jon Matonis: $137.5k through "THE HOLE OF ROY LLC". Salary up from $31k. Jon Matonis acted as Executive Director up to October 2014.
Patrick Murck: $115k. Executive Director of the Foundation (as of November 2014). Salary up from $57k.
Contractors:
"LOCAL PRODUCER" was paid $790k to host Bitcoin 2014 in Amsterdam.
Apple Fundraising Consultants were also paid $123k for activities related to the aforementioned conference.
THEPOLICYCOUNCILCOM INC as the Foundation's 'Global Policy Counsel', paid $114k for about 9 months of work in 2014.
And the breakdown of the functional expenses, oh, so many expenses: Office Expenses: $39k up from $8k in 2013.
Information Technology: $158k up from $67k
Travel: $159k up from $69k
Occupancy: $18k up from $7k.
Accounting: $50.5k up from $9.1k.
Legal fees: $220k up from $161k.
Other: $653k, consisting of:
Professional services: $307k
Public relations: $93k
Executive Directory Compensation: $137.5k
Professional event expenses: $115k
Other salaries and wages: $471k up from $72k
Revenues : Membership dues: $335k down from $358k Conference revenue: $584k up from $337k At the end of 2014 not much was left: $366k.
2015
The beginning of 2015 still had many expenses similar to the above. At the time I came aboard those costs reduced dramatically. There were still high outstanding legal and accounting bills as well as the bitnodes funding and Bitcoin.org funding and other previous obligations that were paid.
Current spending is in the $8k / mo range
Current expenses:
Board salaries: $0
Executive Director salary: $0
All reimbursements for travel: in the range of $3000 - primarily for three speakers airfare and hotel (me, Gavin and Andreas) to DevCore, $600 in pizza for the attendees etc.
Aside from one economy flight to DevCore and the hotel I have personally not been reimbursed for any travel. I have paid some costs from my own credit card for web hosting etc which were also reimbursed - this is also a small amount, perhaps in the $2000 range
Current salaries include one part time bookkeeper and one almost full time ops director.
I'd love any feedback about what the organization can do to break from the past. We could close, sure. I'm not convinced that is what's best for Bitcoin and 8/10 top voted candidates from the last four elections don't think that's what the members want. What else can an organization do to move forward?
EDIT: BTW, here is the mission statement posted a couple weeks back by the new board - IMHO it's more productive to focus on this than the past https://github.com/BruceFenton/bitcoinfoundationplan
submitted by bruce_fenton to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why is Peter Todd wrecking Zeroconf security? Because he is being paid by Big Bitcoin Business.

At the Amsterdam Bitcoin Conference I spent time following Peter and his little circle of friends and business partners. I'm new to Bitcoin so it took me until now to put two and two together and understand what was really going on, but hear me out. Peter spent a lot of time talking to Lawrence Nahum who is the guy behind GreenAddress. On the first or second day they went out to dinner after the days talks were done and went out to a nice little open-air restaurant with a bunch of people from Mastercoin. I sat at a table behind them and could hear their discussions, which including GreenAdddress's transaction confirmation guarantees, and also, an agreement for Peter to do consulting work for GreenAddress. What really stood out to me was the offer to help "shape the Bitcoin ecosystem" in ways beneficial to them. Later in the conference I also overheard a similar deal between Peter and someone, I didn't catch their name, in Coinbase branded apparel. And of course as everyone knows CoinKite hired Peter to be their "Chief Naysayer" during that conference too.
What's in common with all these companies? They're all in the dangerous business of holding other peoples' Bitcoins and GreenAddress and Coinbase both offer for-profit and centralized solutions to guarantee unconfirmed transactions. I'm sure CoinKite will be doing that soon too.
It's obvious why Peter is spending all that time and energy spreading FUD about how insecure unconfirmed transactions are. GreenAddress has been spreading their own FUD. Peter has even been trying to bribe miners to switch to his so called "replace-by-fee", which is really just an attack on secure zeroconf transactions, saying some un-named "site" paid him too. Who might that be? GreenAddress, Coinbase, CoinKite? It's not hard to figure out.
Peter sure seems quite happy to attack and hold back Bitcoin whenever it suits him for the sake of his Big Bitcoin Business contracts. It's not just unconfirmed transactions either. He's been shilling for AppCoins which dump garbage into the blockchain for the sake of pump-and-dump schemes like Mastercoin and Counterparty. (quite the about face from his supposed anti-blockchain bloat positions before) Or look at his weirdly passionate opposition to a simple feature, getutxos, that's needed for Mike Hearn's decentralized fundraising platform Lighthouse. Where's that passion coming from? The heart? Or his salary from Mastercoin, Counterparty and Colored Coins? I'm sure Mastercoin wants the next Maidsafe to happen on their platform, run by and for the benefit of Mastercoin, not Hearn's truly decentralized alternative.
I agree with Peter that GHash.IO is a possible threat to Bitcoin, but what solution does he have? Getting rid of pools. His buddies at the totally discredited Hacking Distributed (remember selfish mining? yeah those guys) run with this FUD, trying to scare the Bitcoin community into making changes to get rid of pools. Sounds like a good idea right? But then I looked further into it and found out he had just been hanging out at CloudHashing. What does banning pools do to the little guy mining decentralized? It puts them out of business because they'll never find a block that's what. Just perfect for CloudHashing's "send us money and we'll run the miners" business model and also GHash.IO's.
Peter likes to talk the big talk about decentralization, but all I am seeing here is paid shilling for the benefit of Big Bitcoin Business.
submitted by alicebtcmayes to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Happy New Year: Presenting the long overdue Bitcoin Foundation 2014 financial results!

Hi,
Today we continue our coverage of the glorious Bitcoin Foundation by assisting them with their own transparency goals. Just like any tax-exempt non-profit the Foundation has to file Form 990 annually, and so they did on 2015-07-23. The website with transparency goals actually previously stated "2014 will become available once filed in the spring of 2015". Par for the course Bruce 'FENTON!' Fenton figured he may as well hide it after realizing the return may reflect poorly on the Foundation. Luckily our shills over at the Foundation Center are kind enough to provide us with a copy.
Bear in mind this is the fiscal year dated 01-01-2014 ending 12-31-2014, the year Bitcoin took a massive hit. For context; the Bitcoin Foundation has one primary asset: BTC-coins. At the beginning of the year BTC-coins were still worth quite a bit (some $800), while shortly into the year they traded slightly closer to fair-value (ending the year at $316). Perhaps you would expect the Foundation to curb expenses, however that goes against the libertarian school of thought (fuck you, got mine!).
Now on to the good stuff, here's how our favorite group of libertarians spent the majority of donated funbux in one year, knowing the Foundation's assets were depleting rapidly. As Reddit is known for bullshit doxxing rules we'll stick to what is written on the return, which is very much open to public inspection. Now, without further ado;
As we discovered in 2013 the Foundation's primary goal is rewarding their board of directors & officers, as we all know they work very hard:
And there are some contractors:
And the breakdown of the functional expenses, oh, so many expenses:
The revenues improved a lot of course, as you would expect with the increased expenses:
At the end of 2014 not much was left: $366k. Of course some membership fees were coming in early 2015 which allowed the board to continue their rampage a little longer. In the board meeting minutes of 7-21 you can read that the party is over ($59k left) and expenses have been cut to $14k/month. Meeting minutes of October show "Brock says that it looks like things were going well from a revenue standpoint until February and we've lost the remaining cash since then" (LOL). Desperation strikes near the end of the meeting with Bruce 'FENTON!' Fenton asking all participants to individually raise $10k before the next board meeting. Olivier Janssens doubts this is possible, and also states he isn't happy that financials haven't been published yet. Well now they are.
In fairness to the Foundation there have been some roster changes and most (if not all) people mentioned above are no longer involved. Which may or may not have something to do with that fact they could no longer get paid by the Foundation (kidding, of course it has everything to do with that).
tl;dr Libertarians are bad at managing finances.
submitted by BTC-coins to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin may not have as high TpS as Visa, but at least with bitcoin i’ll never have to worry about this:

I originally wrote this a month ago but decided not to post it. After being denied twice since, I have decided that I should post it.
Today my card was blocked in France while trying to top up credit on my phone. I was given three questions, answered each of them correctly (where i’ve lived in boulder, where my brother lives, how old my mom is) and yet I was still blocked. I was also told by my bank that there’s nothing they can do about this, it’s between visa and the merchant, so as long as I try to use visa I will always run into this problem. At any point my card can be blocked because they ask questions that cannot be answered correctly, or even when answered correctly it will still be blocked.
original post
Backstory: I lived in Thailand and had plans to go to a conference in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. Today I used my bank card to purchase one of the few things in life that I can’t with BTC, a visa for Vietnam. However, when going through processing I was asked three verification questions:
Not sure of the exact wording used, but it was basically how did you come to own/how did you buy/etc.. Unfortunately for me I’ve never seen that address in my life, i have no idea where it comes from as I’ve only ever lived at two residences in America, both of which I know the address to. There was option for this is not applicable to me which i chose.
My mom’s last name isn’t tackett though, so I don’t know why they’re using that name. She and my dad have been divorced since before I can remember, so they’re using information that’s out of date since at least 1995. The age ranges they gave me didn’t actually have one with her age, it was something like 25-35, 40-45, 46-55, 60+, my mom is 56. There was no correct answer. I chose the closest and went from there.
My brother moved several months ago, so again, there was no correct answer. But it did have his previous city, so I answered with that.
After all of that they deemed that it was a fraudulent transaction and wouldn’t process it. Luckily for me, the fraud department at my bank was online and was able to remove the block and for me to book my visa. So you may say, “see! the system works." However, when I had this exact same problem in 2013 while in Thailand trying to buy a flight i lost out on hundreds of dollars because I had to go to an agent and pay with cash.
I had a conversation with some people in a bitcoin wechat group im in about how much I hate banks after taking my ICBC (largest bank in the world) card to an ICBC branch in malaysia to withdraw all my money since I can’t use the card in Thailand (even at an ICBC branch). Unfortunately in Malaysia I also can’t use that card, even at an ICBC. People were saying i’m doing myself a disservice by not having a bank, but in the past 8 days i’ve been denied my money from my bank three times, once in Thailand trying to use an ICBC, once in Malaysia trying to use an ICBC, and now by Visa. I’ve never once been prompted to go through verification with bitcoin, i’ve never once been denied the ability to send money, and for the people saying the verification/restrictions are for my safety, i’ve never had as much as a satoshi stolen from me, but i have had to spend hundreds of dollars to fix the mess caused by my banks.
This is why i’ve had my salary paid 100% in bitcoin for over 2 years, this is why I hold the vast majority of my money in bitcoin, and this is why I know that bitcoin has a future. To anybody who says that the current banking system works just fine, that’s ludicrous, start traveling and nearly every day you’ll see why bitcoin is needed; fees to convert currency, 5-50%—yes, it was literally 50% to convert Vietnamese dong to Thai baht at the Phuket airport; fees to withdraw from an ATM ($6, 2%); and tons of places charge you extra 3-5% plus flat fee if you use a cc.
Other stories about why I hate banks
Story time: In 2014 I was at Bitcoin2014 in Amsterdam, had an amazing trip that forever changed my life. While there I discovered that if you don’t have chip & pin a lot of places won’t accept your debit card, and even worse that they don’t even accept cash. My bank didn’t offer chip & pin cards when mine was issued so unfortunately couldn’t use my card nor my cash. When i went back to the states in July I asked specifically for a chip and pin card but they said they still don’t offer them and that I’d have to deal with swipe and sign for the time being. So I got my card and headed off on my travels once more, this time to kyrgyzstan and kazakhstan. When I get there I receive an email from my bank that they’ll promptly be canceling my card as they’re switching everyone over to chip and pin. I could ask for a two-week extension, but that’s it, after that I’ll have to wait for my new card to arrive. They also won’t send cards abroad, so i have to have it sent to my family and then have them ship it to asia (one card has already been lost in this process). So once again, I have no way to access my money.
Second Story time: When bitcoin hit $1000 in 2013 some friends and I took a trip to the Philippines. I sold a bitcoin and had the fiat transferred to my bank account (Wells Fargo). I went to use my card at an ATM and it was denied, I called my bank and tried to get the situation fixed. After going through social security number, recent withdrawal locations/amounts, and account information they said "no problem, we’ll have it all fixed here shortly, just need you to tell me how much your monthly mortgage payments are.” I was 21 and living in Beijing, i didn’t have any mortgage payments. So he let me know that wasn’t a problem, just needed to know how much my monthly car payment was. I was 21 and living in Beijing, I didn't have a monthly car payment. I was then promptly told “bummer, nothing we can do” and had to spend well over an hour going from supervisor to supervisor before I finally got the block lifted. It’s important to note that I notified them of my travel plans well in advance of my trip.
This is why I love bitcoin, my money is actually my money and i can use it 24/7/365. Even if I need to wait 30 minutes for a confirmation, it is vastly superior to not being to use your money at all.
Tldr; Visa has deemed my transactions fraudulent several times because i was unable to answer security questions that don't have correct answers. Bitcoin has never told me I can't spend my money.
submitted by zanetackett to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Actual data: Nobody pays with Bitcoin. The unprecedented success story of Bitcoin in the Netherlands!

It's time to lighten up guys, let me tell you the success story of Buttcoin in the Netherlands. In case you didn't know: the Netherlands is a small country in Europe, best known on /bitcoin for being the frontrunner in cryptocurrencies, acquiring many upvotes. Market-research firm Multiscope confirm their views: one out of three Dutchmen knows how Bitcoin works, and another 41% have heard of it. This is not so surprising as just about every newspaper or news website writes about Buttcoin's failures, hell it even got coverage in primetime news shows. Multiscope estimated that 1% of the population own these tokens (as of December 2013).
But that's not all, not even close! The city of Arnhem has been dubbed 'Bitcoin City', the Hague has a 'Bitcoinboulevard' and Amsterdam hosted Bitcoin 2014 where subsequently BitPay opened their European Headquarters. 19 days ago the nation's biggest e-commerce payment gateway Mollie started taking Bitcoin, with /bitcoin quickly bragging about their big-name clients: ING, Facebook and Heineken. Mollie was quick to double down and now automatically provides each new client with Bitcoin services, thereby adding 800 new shops per month (unless they opt-out), on top of the 800 shops that already opted in! We even have two exchanges specifically designed to cater the Dutch market, instant and dirt-cheap. And then there are conferences, with actual speakers from meaningful institutions. To the moon!
But there's one small problem: nobody in the entire country pays with damn Buttcoins. So far Mollie processed almost 10 transactions for their 800 clients............... combined! Mollie's biggest clients such as domestic IT-shop CoolBlue saw this coming from a mile away, instantly telling Buttcoin preachers to suck it. Naturally, none of the big names Reddit listed and upvoted even touched the currency of failure. Mollie's competitor Bitmymoney isn't doing much better: usually processing multiple payments a week for their 70 clients combined. The eleven restaurants on Bitcoinboulevard that started accepting Bitcoins two months ago are in the same boat: combined they had 70 transactions (1 per day!), and multiple quit as it was too difficult. BitcoinCity-day had a surprising number of Bitcoin-paying participants (34 unique addresses), but perhaps not as surprising considering Armory came out to hand out free Buttcoins and there were other prizes involved.
So what is Buttcoin good for then? Well aside from Madoff laughing his ass off, druglords seem to do well! So far one Dutchman has managed to get himself caught in Miami, which is well known to be a great place to get caught red-handed. Many others got arrested locally for dealing insane amounts of drugs on SilkRoad. The Dutch Central Bank had about enough of all the crime; today they stated that banks better shape up quickly when it comes to cryptocurrencies. Oh well there is always the remittance market right? To the moon!
Sources here.
submitted by PayingWithActualMone to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Coin hustle by Tim Draper

https://reddit.com/link/8mtk9g/video/ire1m2b20o011/player
Legendary venture investor Tim Draper has changed his role and made up a Bitcoin rap performance at a technology conference in Amsterdam.
“Governments’ don’t know what to do”, he sang.
Draper is known for his consistent interest in cryptocurrency. In 2014, he bought 30,000 Bitcoins from a U.S. government.
Enjoy!
submitted by KICKICO-Platform to KICKICO_Platform [link] [comments]

NEW: German Hinterland Base Chemistry Trading Hubs by Smart Contracts

At the LogiChem2018 trade conference in Amsterdam participants were trading base chemistry in the form of a computer game for 4 players, SelfreHub, using a smart contract and the freeware software package Otree. These types of contracts are considered a prerequisite to use Blockchain as communication for commodity markets.
Most people know commodity market either from their own heating oil purchase, or from the stock market quotations for crude oil, wheat or maybe even coffee bean futures. However, the vast majority of commodities are traded very differently, namely in long-term contracts between operators of raw material plants such as cement factories, sugar refineries or chemical plants. "Long term" often means 1 year at a fixed price.
Fiat Money plays a big role in that world - delivery of these goods vs Money or better vs. Bank Guarantee. Interbank interest rates also play a major role, as the material inside large storages is leased to banks to gain the most efficient access to finance, sometimes even just for a few weeks.
However, most plants convert commodities only to other commodities, meaning they buy, for example, Crude oil convert it with a refinery process into gasoline, then sell it - often for a very small relative conversion margin, such as approx. 5 ct/Liter in the case of regular gasoline. The idea to use a Blockchain technology (raw material A in - Bitcoin payment out - raw material B out - Bitcoin payment in) is therefore already since a few years in discussion. However, the missing building block has been a nice, liquid market for such blockchain-based contracts.
‘Nice' markets have to be in the form of Hubs for commodity traders. Hubs are the basis for fungible contracts, such as futures. It is precisely that problem where the computer game's smart contracts provide the solution, since they are self-regulating in a public available algorithms. This means they essentially adjust their regional definition through analysis just of traded recent prices, not having to know anything about real factory capacities or the marketing strategies of their operators.
The founder of a start-up from Hamburg Oxandel, Björn Michaelis, who was involved in the development of the SelfRe-Hub Game, and brokers these contracts since last year in Germany between hot dip galvanizers and the chemical industry, said it would be like making the invisible hand of Adam Smith a bit more visible. When users - despite being in tough competition - and therefore don’t want to exchange true information, except the minimal needed like binding purchase and selling orders, very easily minimize their overall necessary freight distances - despite they dont't intend to cooperate - it seemes initially like Magic.
But these kind of clever contracts are not new to Econmists at all and well understood. The ideas go back to a game-theoretical thought experiment by Harold Hotelling from year 1928, which is often illustrated with the behavior of ice cream vendors at a beach. Jean Tirole, Nobel Laureate in Economics in 2014, also explains in his book "Economics for the Common God" that contract structures with fair and meaningful incentives - such as in this case the minimization of truck freight distances - are preferrable to the typical regulations of antitrust authorities sometimes forced on commodity producers, because the authorities usually don't have enough information or resources to correctly assess the behavious in the markets (Tirole Video).
The trading scheme seems to be almost "moneyless" and "creditless" - and therefore Austrian School Economics may provide the right tools to understand further implications.
submitted by Eddi_D to Commodities [link] [comments]

Blockchained Spot Commodity Market - Austrian School in Action ?

At the LogiChem2018 trade conference in Amsterdam participants were trading base chemistry in the form of a computer game for 4 players, SelfreHub, using a smart contract and the freeware software package Otree. These types of contracts are considered a prerequisite to use Blockchain as communication for commodity markets.
Most people know commodity market either from their own heating oil purchase, or from the stock market quotations for crude oil, wheat or maybe even coffee bean futures. However, the vast majority of commodities are traded very differently, namely in long-term contracts between operators of raw material plants such as cement factories, sugar refineries or chemical plants. "Long term" often means 1 year at a fixed price.
Fiat Money plays a big role in that world - delivery of these goods vs Money or better vs. Bank Guarantee. Interbank interest rates also play a major role, as the material inside large storages is leased to banks to gain the most efficient access to finance, sometimes even just for a few weeks.
However, most plants convert commodities only to other commodities, meaning they buy, for example, Crude oil convert it with a refinery process into gasoline, then sell it - often for a very small relative conversion margin, such as approx. 5 ct/Liter in the case of regular gasoline. The idea to use a Blockchain technology (raw material A in - Bitcoin payment out - raw material B out - Bitcoin payment in) is therefore already since a few years in discussion. However, the missing building block has been a nice, liquid market for such blockchain-based contracts.
‘Nice' markets have to be in the form of Hubs for commodity traders. Hubs are the basis for fungible contracts, such as futures. It is precisely that problem where the computer game's smart contracts provide the solution, since they are self-regulating in a public available algorithms. This means they essentially adjust their regional definition through analysis just of traded recent prices, not having to know anything about real factory capacities or the marketing strategies of their operators.
The founder of a start-up from Hamburg Oxandel, Björn Michaelis, who was involved in the development of the SelfRe-Hub Game, and brokers these contracts since last year in Germany between hot dip galvanizers and the chemical industry, said it would be like making the invisible hand of Adam Smith a bit more visible. When users - despite being in tough competition - and therefore don’t want to exchange true information, except the minimal needed like binding purchase and selling orders, very easily minimize their overall necessary freight distances - despite they dont't intend to cooperate - it seemes initially like Magic.
But these kind of clever contracts are not new to Econmists at all and well understood. The ideas go back to a game-theoretical thought experiment by Harold Hotelling from year 1928, which is often illustrated with the behavior of ice cream vendors at a beach. Jean Tirole, Nobel Laureate in Economics in 2014, also explains in his book "Economics for the Common God" that contract structures with fair and meaningful incentives - such as in this case the minimization of truck freight distances - are preferrable to the typical regulations of antitrust authorities sometimes forced on commodity producers, because the authorities usually don't have enough information or resources to correctly assess the behavious in the markets (Tirole Video).
The trading scheme seems to be almost "moneyless" and "creditless" - and therefore Austrian School Economics may provide the right tools to understand further implications.
submitted by Eddi_D to austrian_economics [link] [comments]

I asked my kid's school lunch Corp. entity @HeartlandHPY to accept Bitcoin and got a snippy response, this was my reply. How'd I do ?

Hi MSB support,
Thanks for your prompt reply.
Crypto currencies are indeed pretty new (or rather, in the case of Bitcoin, not so new but only recently have larger corporate entities come to begin to understand it's usability and potential).
With respect, I'd like to address the great points you made:
-We can not support Bitcoin as Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority or banks
That's not a reason why you cannot accept it. Bitcoin is legal and many businesses both small and several very large ones are very actively accepting, processing and saving money using Bitcoin.
Two you may have heard of are:
- Bitcoin is open-source; its design is public, nobody owns or controls Bitcoin.
That's correct, and frankly many folks, including many respected economists and attorneys consider that either a strength or a non-issue. Many compare this fact in a different software domain to Linux which powers a significant share of most of the worlds servers.
- For legal purposes there needs to be ownership over funds and the issues with Bitcoin mining could be a problem.
There's no fundamental legal issue, it's legal the IRS has even made several rulings on how taxes related to Bitcoins should be processed and there are several large, well establish Bitcoin payment Merchant processors, including coinbase.com and bitpay.com - the latter processes Bitcoin at a 1% rate straight into USD via ACH to any personal or corporate bank account: http://blog.bitpay.com/2014/05/04/merchant-spotlight-sendowl.html
Look, if you're not ready to consider Bitcoin I can respect that but I hope some of the info above might be useful when there may be an opportunity for a reevaluation.
Bitcoin is money for the internet (and even more important the internet of money and beyond).
Thanks for listening, feel free to contact me if you'd like any more info or discussion.
submitted by fuyuasha to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

#Bitcoin2014 - Panel: Economic Theory of Bitcoin #Bitcoin2014 - Panel: iGaming and Digital Currencies #Bitcoin2014 - Annual State of Bitcoin by Gavin Andresen, Chief Scientist of Bitcoin Foundation Bitcoin 2014 Conference Aftermovie #Bitcoin2014 - Keynote Address,

We welcome bitcoiners from around the world to Amsterdam for the Bitcoin 2014 conference. This year we opened our European Headquarters in the city centre, and we have been busy adding merchants around Amsterdam and across Europe. Whether you're looking for a late-night delivery snack from thuisbezorgd.nl or looking to have an espresso and croissant in the morning, you can check out using ... Par Bitcoin Cours, le 24 avril 2014 La conférence bitcoin 2014 se déroulera du 15 au 17 Mai 2014 à Amsterdam. Que se passe t-il lors de cet événement? Selon la Fondation Bitcoin, " C'est le lieu où les investisseurs, les technologues, les régulateurs, les cadres, les entrepreneurs, les promoteurs et les décideurs se réunissent pour façonner collectivement l'avenir de la crypto ... Chief Scientist of the Bitcoin Foundation Gavin Andresen shares his views on the 'State of Bitcoin' in 2014 from the stage of the Bitcoin 2014 conference in Amsterdam. Heads up folks! Bitcoin 2014: Building the Digital Economy conference is being held in Amsterdam starting May 15 to 17 2014. Amsterdam Bitcoin 2014 event... Enjoy my Huzzaz video collection! Bitcoin 2014 conference - Interviewing Tony Gallip...

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#Bitcoin2014 - Panel: Economic Theory of Bitcoin

Bitcoin 2014's Keynote Address took place on Friday, May 16, 2014 at the Passenger Terminal Amsterdam Main Deck in the Netherlands. Timeline: 00:00:10 - Jon Matonis: Opening Remarks 00:09:02 ... Bitcoin 2014's The Digital Economy's Panel: iGaming and Digital Currencies took place on Saturday, May 17, 2014 at the Passenger Terminal Amsterdam (PTA) Backstage Area from 3:00pm-4:00pm. Stefan Thomas about Bitcoin (at Bitcoin conference in Amsterdam 2014) Bitcoin 2014's The Digital Economy Panel: Economic Theory of Bitcoin took place on Saturday, May 17, 2014 at the Passenger Terminal Amsterdam (PTA) Backstage Area from 9:30am-10:30am. Bitcoin is a ... Bitcoin 2014's Annual State of Bitcoin Address took place on Friday, May 16, 2014 at the Passenger Terminal Amsterdam Main Deck in the Netherlands. Hear the word direct from the Bitcoin Foundation ...

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